UN Human Rights Office concerned about the lack of assistance to migrants at sea Drastic drop in irregular migration to Europe during lockdown Between xenophobia and solidarity: How migrants in Europe are treated Transit migrants benefit from vocational training Mediterranean: 40,000 people intercepted and returned to Libya between 2017 and 2020

Every day, people make the difficult decision to leave their homes in search of a better future. Many risk their lives attempting to reach Europe. Are you thinking of migrating or have you already begun your migration journey? Learn more about your legal options and the risks of irregular migration to help you make an […]

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UN Human Rights Office concerned about the lack of assistance to migrants at sea

Restrictions related to the coronavirus pandemic have resulted in a lack of assistance for migrants in the Central...

Drastic drop in irregular migration to Europe during lockdown

During the coronavirus pandemic, Europe has witnessed a major decrease in the arrival of irregular migrants, especially...

Between xenophobia and solidarity: How migrants in Europe are treated

After overcoming major obstacles to reach Europe, many migrants hope to set up a new life for themselves in a new...

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COVID-19 and migration

Enroute is the help you need

Find the right information – Enroute

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Former migrant launches political party in Niger

Oumarou Maman Rabiou has just launched his political party, the Party for Unity, Solidarity and Development (PUSD-Lokatchi). After several trips around Africa and to Europe in search of a better life, young Rabiou finally decided to return home and fight for the emancipation of the youth in his country. Recently, he met with TMP to share his story. Why launch a political party? My dream has always been to work for a fairer society, keeping the common good as a fundamental value. Solidarity must be placed at the heart of society and individual relationships. I also strongly believe that it is possible to build a new Niger. From a more political point of view, I would like to see the parties evolve, to move away from "Daddy’s Politics ", to leave more room for young people and for new forms of activism. How can the fate of Nigerien youth be changed?

Baldé, a Senegalese migrant, opens a restaurant in Agadez

We’re in Agadez’s main square. A young, well-dressed man welcomes us. His name is Baldé Chérif Ousmane and he’s a 30-year-old man from Senegal who currently lives in Agadez, Niger.  Having arrived in the city as a migrant in transit, Baldé decided a few months ago to put an end to his attempt to reach Europe. Instead, he decided to stay in Agadez to fulfil his lifelong dream of owning a restaurant.  "I left Senegal in 2007. I went to Nouadhibou in Mauritania to go to Spain,” said Baldé. But the crossing wasn’t easy: “We made several attempts. The first time, we went in a dugout boat led by a Ghanaian captain.” This failed attempt to reach Spain took almost two weeks and many people died. Baldé and the other migrants returned to Nouadhibou to plan another trip which they embarked on a week later. This time, the

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